“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

Benjamin Franklin

Training and Development Elevator Speech

It is hard to believe that so many of today’s organizations still do not see the ultimate potential that training and development can have on the success of a business. Training can impact motivation, employee performance, and can contribute to new development, production, and business growth. Imagine if your company were to produce the best new product on the market, however no one ever took the time to train employees or customers how to use that product. Your business might lose out on substantial profit because of this misstep.

Image In order to stay competitive in today’s market, organizations must realize that “Training is not a luxury; it is a necessity if companies are to participate in the global and electronic marketplaces by offering high quality products and services” (Noe, 2013). Many companies believe that training must be time-consuming and costly in order to be effective, however this is not always the case. Simply incorporating informal training such as employee mentoring, a company blog, or on-the-job training can offer benefits that will support the business strategy, including hiring and retaining productive employees. The essential goal of training and development is learning, and learning can be achieved in a multitude of ways with a little time, motivation, and creativity!  References: Noe, R. A. (2013). Employee training and development (6th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

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Comments on: "Training and Development" (11)

  1. Stephanie said:

    I think I have finally figured out how to follow your blog! You make a great point that training doesn’t have to be time consuming to be effective. Different companies and scenarios call for different approaches and some can most certainly be simple and inexpensive while still maintaining their effectiveness. Companies that don’t embrace training opportunities do miss out and their employees will suffer.

  2. heatherborelli said:

    Hi Lori

    I’ll be following you. I look forward to reading your posts.

    Heather

  3. You pointed out….”Imagine if your company were to produce the best new product on the market, however no one ever took the time to train employees or customers how to use that product. Your business might lose out on substantial profit because of this misstep.”

    SO true! It doesn’t matter how great a product or process is if it is not understood by its users or consumers. Training allows us to comprehend and share the intricacies that can only be identified in the instructional process.

  4. Hi Lori,
    Thank you for sharing your elevator speech! You presented some great ideas to get the listener thinking about how training is an essential component to maintaining a productive and competitive organization. I particularly liked that you highlighted some examples of simple cost effective solutions for addressing training and development in the organization. I think often times when we say the word “training” the listener may have many different ideas or perspectives on what this exactly means depending on their experiences with training in the past. When you mention training to someone they automatically envision an intensive, costly, and time consuming initiative which granted sometimes may be the case, but it is important for people to understanding that training and development can fit into the concept of leaning thinking where we can do more with less (Noe, 2010).

    Thanks again for sharing, I enjoyed hearing your elevator speech and look forward to continuing to read your insights on your blog!
    Amber

    Noe, R. A. (2013). Employee training and development (6th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

  5. heatherborelli said:

    Hi Lori

    I was unable to play your audio file, however the text of your post was very well organized and persuasive. Focusing on how training can be easily embedded into the organization’s daily activities through “employee mentoring, a company blog, or on-the-job training” was a creative angle for your elevator pitch, as it could help to reduce your listener’s resistance to training if they are based out of concerns of increased costs, lost productivity, or complex programming requirements. Jennings (2013) discussed embedding learning into workflows as a means of providing “learning within the moment of “apply” at the point of need…as it offers a wider range of opportunities for on-going development as a part of workflow”. Jennings (2013) also noted “embedding learning in work can also be achieved without sophisticated technology. There are many ways to break free from the inertia of away-from-work training through simple job aids, to ‘sidekicks’ and ‘planners’”. Convincing the listener of the ability to save time, money, and resource by utilizing an embedded training model targeted to specific organizational needs should be an effective strategy to gain at least conditional support of a pilot implementation of your proposal.

    Heather

    Reference
    Jennings, C. (2013, October 14). Workplace learning: Adding, embedding, & extracting. Retrieved from: http://charles-jennings.blogspot.com/2013/10/workplace-learning-adding-embedding.html

  6. Lori,

    You have presented a very good elevator speech that addresses not only the reluctance companies have in investing their monies in training, but actual, positive reasons their reluctance should be put aside.

    As you stated, training is a necessity for companies that want to remain competitive in today’s global and electronic business markets. Training provides employees with the skills and abilities to perform their jobs with expertise, communicate with customers in a positive, professional manner, and add value to the company through the knowledge they gain and the career path they develop and pursue.

    You also pointed out the various forms of training employees can engage in that makes training time efficient and effective. No longer is training conformed in a face-to-face classroom setting, but it can take place at any location, with any employee, at a time that is optimal for them. Training can include mentoring, shadowing seasoned workers, work blogging, and/or on-the-job training.

    Strategic training and development programs, aligned with companies strategic goals, makes it possible for them to achieve their goals and realize a greater return on their investments. Training programs make it possible for companies to not only strengthen their bottom line, but also make an impact in their business market. Training programs lead to developing a positive presence with customers, as well as developing employee staff that is proficient, professional, and committed.

    Thank you again, Lori for your insightful blog post.

    Gayle

  7. Hi Lori,

    I apologize if I am doubling up on my response to your elevator speech. I noticed that my response that I attempted to post on Saturday, but it is not showing up so I thought I would try to post it again.

    Thank you for sharing your elevator speech! You presented some great ideas to get the listener thinking about how training is an essential component to maintaining a productive and competitive organization. I particularly liked that you highlighted some examples of simple cost effective solutions for addressing training and development in the organization. I think often times when we say the word “training” the listener may have many different ideas or perspectives on what this exactly means depending on their experiences with training in the past. When you mention training to someone they automatically envision an intensive, costly, and time consuming initiative which granted sometimes may be the case, but it is important for people to understanding that training and development can fit into the concept of leaning thinking where we can do more with less (Noe, 2010).

    Thanks again for sharing, I enjoyed hearing your elevator speech and look forward to continuing to read your insights on your blog!
    Amber

    Noe, R. A. (2013). Employee training and development (6th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

  8. I do agree that more businesses need to understand that training is imperative. There better trained an employee is, the more successful a job he/she will do.

  9. Lori,

    I like how you invite the listener to imagine their company producing the best new product and how training can get them there. Great elevator voice.

    Maria

  10. Hi Lori,

    I apologize if I am doubling up on my response to your elevator speech. I noticed that my response that I attempted to post on Saturday, but it is not showing up so I thought I would try to post it again.

    Thank you for sharing your elevator speech! You presented some great ideas to get the listener thinking about how training is an essential component to maintaining a productive and competitive organization. I particularly liked that you highlighted some examples of simple cost effective solutions for addressing training and development in the organization. I think often times when we say the word “training” the listener may have many different ideas or perspectives on what this exactly means depending on their experiences with training in the past. When you mention training to someone they automatically envision an intensive, costly, and time consuming initiative which granted sometimes may be the case, but it is important for people to understanding that training and development can fit into the concept of leaning thinking where we can do more with less (Noe, 2010).

    Thanks again for sharing, I enjoyed hearing your elevator speech and look forward to continuing to read your insights on your blog!
    Amber

    Noe, R. A. (2013). Employee training and development (6th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

  11. Kim Bargiel said:

    Great elevator speech!! You catch the stakeholder right at the beginning by asking them to imagine themselves in an ideal situation for their company (not your exact words but your idea). This allows them to really open their mind to the help that successful training can give them.

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